How to Write a Great Resume Summary With Examples

A resume summary is a concise summary of who you are and the value that you can bring to an organization. Today (2018), all strong resumes are expected to have resume summaries in place of the antiquated “Objective.” The resume summary is essentially your elevator speech, which is a very brief “commercial” of who you are and how you can benefit an organization.

What To Include

First, be certain to include a resume summary right after your contact information. Excluding a summary or just listing a few bullets about your qualifications (or worse listing an Objective) will nearly guarantee your resume gets passed unless you personally know the hiring manager. The resume summary is essentially a condensed version of the “Tell Me About Yourself Question.” When writing a summary, you want to ensure that you include relevant and specific information that showcases who you are without being too generic. A great summary will include who you are, what you’ve done, what value you bring, and what your strengths are. Also, you should always include your resume title above the resume summary to make it clear who you are (i.e. Sales Professional, IT Executive, Project Manager, etc.)

Keep It Short

You may have been in an industry for 20+ years and have done enough to fill 100+ pages of text; however, your summary shouldn’t be longer than five or six sentences. TheLadders (2017) conducted a study and showed that the average recruiter spends 6-seconds reviewing a resume, so your resume summary should be concise and compelling. You need to quickly capture the hiring managers attention and highlight your top-selling points or unique value proposition. Avoid being redundant and including too many generic sentences that can apply to anyone.

Three Great Resume Summary Examples:

Example #1 – Global Vice Chairman

Results-driven global executive with a proven track record of successfully building and leading communications businesses in North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, and Latin America. Expertise in corporate trust and reputation, operational leadership, business development, strategic planning, and streamlining operations to significantly increase revenue and profitability. Highly regarded commentator on issues of corporate trust, crisis, and corporate reputation for CNN, Bloomberg, CNBC, the BBC, and Channel News Asia in addition to delivering insights for print, trade, and other broadcast media on five continents. Presenter at the United Nations Global Compact Leaders Conference, the Clinton Global Initiative, The World Economic Forum’s Anti-Corruption Conference, FSG’s Shared Value Conference, and countless industry and client events.

Example #2 – Senior Sales Executive

Award-winning sales executive with vast experience in global sales/marketing and financial management. Expertise in sourcing and retaining new business as the deal lead and providing the framework for completing KYC due diligence for specialized clients. Demonstrated history of generating more than $100+ million in wins and bookings. Successful client-relations manager who understands client needs, manages expectations, builds lasting relationships, instills trust, and ensures the delivery of integrated solutions. Highly adept working in the FinTech industry.

Example #3 – Technical Director

Highly talented IT executive with a demonstrated track record of designing, building, and rolling out multi-million-dollar strategic, tactical IT, and operational solutions that significantly contributes to organizational performance. Oversaw the build-out of 450+ retail stores from a technology perspective including hardware, software, LAN/WAN, and telephony along with managing 350+ projects’ lifecycles from inception to rollout. Expertise in effectively leading teams, instilling passion, and developing people to achieve excellence. Strong ability to communicate with both technical and non-technical audiences.

All three of these examples clearly exemplify who the candidate is, what the candidate has done, what value the candidate brings, and what the candidates strengths are in a concise and compelling manner without unnecessary fluff. Fluff is a resume summary that’s filled with generic sentences like the example below:

Example #4 – Generic Fluff Summary

Energetic and creative professional with a cross-functional background in operations. History of working well with all levels of leadership and developing effective relationships. Strong ability to make immediate and valuable contributions to an organization. Flexible and open-minded with an outstanding ability to adapt to any situation. Excellent research, strategic thinking, communication, and presentation skills.

Conclusion

Think of your resume summary as the only thing a hiring manager will read, because in many cases it just may be. Your resume summary is your elevator pitch and should include who you are, what you’ve done, what value you bring, and what your strengths are in a concise and compelling manner. Remember to include your title above your summary to immediately identify who you are. You can use a generic “Professional Summary” or “Qualifications” if you have a very diverse background and it’s difficult to define who you are in a single title. Always remember to include a resume summary as candidates without one will surely be passed.

8 Things We Can Actually Learn From Machiavelli’s “The Prince”

1. You can’t please everyone. (The need to avoid contempt and hatred).

Machiavelli constantly noted that it is impossible for a Prince to satisfy both his subjects and his nobles at the same time. The prince would have to sacrifice the needs of one for the other.

Stating clear examples from history, Machiavelli also used the Romans as a case study. He stated that aside from the subjects and nobles, Roman emperors still had soldiers to deal with.

In a modern world view, people wrestle with the notion that they can try to make everyone happy. With some accepting that they would have to displease one in order to please the other, others still hang on to the illusion that they can satisfy everyone. As noted by Machiavelli, trying to please everyone ultimately leads to disaster.

2. Being generous all the time is being stupid all the time. (Generosity and Parsimony)

It’s no rare thing to find fundamentally good people. People who display extraordinary attributes of altruism that surpass even the likes of religious clerics, which is a good thing. But giving away more than you have can be self defeating.

According to Machiavelli, in people’s efforts to become generous, they lose the ability to do so. That simply means that you can only be generous until you lose everything you can be generous with.

He emphasized that the people considered extremely generous in history only did so with what didn’t belong to them in the first place. He cited figures such as Alexander the great, Cyrus and Julius Caesar who were more liberal with what wasn’t their own.

There’s nothing bad in being generous. If you have enough to give, then by all means, do so. But if don’t, do not risk your well-being and that of your family’s for someone else.

It is important to also note that Machiavelli noticed how quickly people can turn on you if you tell them “no”. You become either poor or despised, “seeking to escape poverty”.

3. People cannot be trusted (Cruelty and Compassion)

This is harsh but true. Machiavelli strongly objected to promises made with just words. They could be easily broken.

His words were: “Men are ungrateful, fickle, liars and deceiver. They shun danger and are greedy for profit. While you treat them well, they are yours… But when you are in danger, they turn you away” those words deeply and quite aggressively reflected his views on humanity. But his stance on trust was somewhat accurate.

You should not depend entirely on trust. If you do, be ready to get your heart broken.

4. Education is important (How a prince should organize his militia)

Machiavelli’s idea of education was taking military exercises in the art of war during and after wartime.

He stated how important it is for a prince to know more about war and historical events based on war.

Similarly, in our generation, education is equally important. Knowledge has become more powerful than ever. And what is the best way of acquiring knowledge than education?

You don’t need to know about the art of war, it’s execution and implementation. But learning how to read and write is of equal importance.

5. Always expect the unexpected. (How a prince should organize his militia)

Philopoemen, as cited by Machiavelli, was praised for thinking of war during peacetime. He casually engaged in conversations about military strategy amongst friends.

You have to expect an unexpected change in your life at an unexpected point, one you could not have foreseen. It is always wise to prepare for them.

Setting aside money for an unforeseeable financial problem in the future would be the modern day equivalent to expecting the unexpected. Just like Philopomen.

6. You cannot be all good (and it’s okay). (The things for which men, and especially princes are praised or blamed)

In an era where black is white and white is black and it’s near impossible to tell one from the other, we are often faced with moral ambiguity.

Should I do the “right” thing and hurt someone else in the process? What exactly is the right thing in the first place?. Well Machiavelli says it’s okay. No one is all good.

He enumerated qualities such as faithfulness, courageousness, frivolousness and religiousness. It is laudable for a prince to have them, but due to the “conditions of the world”, princes cannot have those qualities and observe them completely.

Real life is complex and it is not without his drawbacks.

7. Decisiveness and Conviction. (how a prince must win honour)

According to Machiavelli, there’s danger in neutrality and being completely at someone else’s mercy.

Delaying a problem doesn’t actually help you in any way. Indecision equals failure. That’s not ruling out patience completely which is instrumental in solving the problem. But there’s a fine line between patience and delay.

A problem is better solved when confronted.

8. Having a reputation for cruelty is hazardous (The need to avoid contempt and hatred)

Most people do not make it their life’s mission to be known as cruel. They might consider themselves as being strict or forward, but others might see them as bad, wicked and cruel.

Knowingly or not, being cruel is bad in any century. Machiavelli knew this and discuss the topic at length.

A prince, according to him, must always try to avoid being hated and despised by his subjects. Otherwise he risks a rebellion or an uprising.

“Cruelty” is a word that probably comes to mind when discussing Machiavelli and as evidenced in his works about how morality can be altered, it’s not so surprising. But he also noted how cruelty has incited revolutions and brought down empire s. The lesson here is, always try to be kind..

Why Art Collectors Are in Love With Floral Paintings These Days

Reproductions of floral paintings are selling like hot cakes in online stores dedicated to modern art for sale, sculpture home décor and more

With floral art and floral paintings becoming coveted products for art collectors globally, smart replications and reproductions of some of the most valued floral art forms are making their presence felt in art stores online. Art lovers have a fancy for floral art for two significant reasons, their beauty and meaning. Different flowers tend to have different kinds of symbolic messages attached to them; therefore some flowers tend to be more popular and wanted than others. Across history, artists had been inspired by the prettiest flowers and found them to be the perfect objects for their paintings.

Did you know that some of the earliest known paintings depicted flowers and plants? Here, we have assembled some floral paintings, sculpture home décor that are being purchased by art enthusiasts globally.

‘Roses and Sunflowers’ (1886):

A masterpiece by Vincent van Gogh, this 1886 creation is currently hosted at ‘Kunsthalle Mannheim’, a much famed museum showcasing modern and contemporary paintings. Like most paintings and art forms by Vincent van Gogh, this one was also created with oil upon canvas. An art store online selling floral painting reproductions would surely have this on its cards.

‘Bouquet’ (1599)

If you have already invested in the best modern art for sale online and would like to opt for something flowery for a change, then this Jan Brueghel the Elder painting is what you should go for without any further ado. Painted in 1599, the epic creation is one of the oldest floral paintings known to mankind. It portrays many beautiful flowers and serves to be a wonderful example of conventional floral art

‘Vase of Flowers’ (1480)

This coveted painting, like many others belonging to the same era, depicts religious symbolism to the hilt. These symbolic messages go back in times and may not have their desired relevance in the contemporary world; nevertheless, the painting in which they are presented is notching favors everywhere.

Still-Life of Flowers’ (1614)

This painting is unique in itself and showcases the talent of Ambrosius Bosschaert who created it in 1614. Depicting the still life lead by flowers in the best possible way, the detailing, realism and shading of the painting is beyond compare.

These and many other floral paintings are making it to the art collections of amateur and professional art enthusiasts in a big way. You may like to check out a few of such paintings for your personal or office space as well.

How to Find Your Soul Mate – Get Your House in Order (7 Tips for Women)

Are you ready to receive God’s best? He doesn’t send the supreme to a disorderly house. With that said, shift your focus. Instead of concentrating on finding a soul mate, concentrate on getting yourself prepared. By the way, as previously stated in another article, a woman doesn’t find the man; he finds her. This article discusses seven things to consider as you work to get yourself in order.

7 Tips

1. Know thyself.

Conduct a self-examination. Possessing a keen awareness of yourself is the first rule in any endeavor. With that said, what do you value? What do you respect in others? Where do you draw the line? What’s your communication style? What strengths do you bring to a relationship.

2. Love yourself.

Next to knowing yourself is loving yourself. Otherwise, how can you expect someone else to love you? Love yourself with a man. Love yourself without a man. Most important, know that Jesus loves you.

3. Keep first things first.

What takes precedence now? Some things are more important than others. A friend, for example, made raising her son the primary focus. As a single mother, she did not parade every Tom, Dick, or Harry in front of him or disrupt their home by moving someone in. Now after he went away to college, she let her hair down. Today, he is a well-adjusted, respectful and responsible man. If you’re a single parent, what matters most?

Likewise, how’s your financial health? Focus on eliminating debt and improving your credit. Your mate doesn’t want to inherit a financial wreck.

Even if your family or finances are in tack, other things supersede finding a mate. Pause for a moment or two to assess your present state. Where are you in disarray?

4. Discover your purpose

In short, uncovering your purpose is a pressing matter. Whether you have a mate or not does not exempt you from fulfilling your call (vocation).

5. Pursue your dream(s).

After you uncover the mission, get moving. Your skills and talents are the missing pieces to someone’s puzzle. Moreover, the right place is where your blessings flow.

6. Unload the baggage.

Imagine travelling from place to place with your luggage. You add more items than you remove and before long it’s difficult to carry. Aside from slowing you down, it’s heavy and awkward.

Similarly, when you jump from relationship to relationship emotional baggage accumulates. Instead of taking time to regroup or allow the dust settle, you drag the junk in your trunk (anger, confusion, bitterness, etc.). Eventually, you unload it on the next person. Stop the madness!

7. No stinking thinking.

As women, we’ve been gifted with strong intuition. Yet, we proceed full steam ahead and ignore early warning signs; I’m guilty too. At length, stinking thinking creeps in. Our track records, consequently, hold us hostage with negative views of men, relationships, and marriage. I call it stinking thinking, and it sours everything.

Therefore, change your mindset. Trust God to not only position you for your soul mate but to exceed your expectations. He doesn’t make mistakes.

(Ruby 2.5.1) Windows Fix – “Cannot Load Such File – Sqlite3/Sqlite3_native (LoadError)”

If you use Windows, you must appreciate that there are several gems which require external libraries in order to be “built” properly.

These external libraries are generally not present on your system and are required to be installed (and referenced) to get them working. This is why the likes of the MYSQL2 and RMagick gems are seen as “difficult” to install.

If you’re using SQLite3, things are slightly different.

This gem has several “builds” which are meant to provide functionality across a number of platforms (Windows included). Whilst this works in earlier versions of Ruby, it doesn’t work for Ruby 2.5.1+ – hence the error you’re seeing…

cannot load such file — sqlite3/sqlite3_native (LoadError)

The error is caused by the installation & attempted usage of the “mingw32” version of the gem. This version of the gem is pre-compiled with the SQLite core files, but has issues when being used with the later versions of Ruby.

The solution is to install the gem for the “ruby” platform (which still works fine in Windows):

gem install sqlite3 –platform=ruby

This will install the “native” version of the gem with all the appropriate files etc – but won’t use any of the platform-specific functionality that comes with the likes of the mingw32 version.

This will work 100% out of the box.

However, there’s another problem. If you use “bundler”, it will often override the native gem installation in favour of a platform-specific one. This means that if you run bundle update / bundle install, it will likely install the sqlite3 gem with mingw32 platform.

In this instance, you need to uninstall *any* references to the latter by using “gem uninstall”. Here’s what typically happens (for us):

bundle update [installs sqlite3]
gem uninstall sqlite3 [shows selection]
remove “mingw32” variant
rails s [should work 100%]

This will get the system working with the gem.

The big problem is that whenever you use the “mingw32” version of the gem, it will have a set of references/calls which are designed specifically to call particular elements of the gem.

In Ruby 2.5.1+ – for whatever reason – these calls are not entirely used to ensure that the system is able to make the most progress, hence the error you’re seeing. To fix this, you need to be able to essentially “force” your system to only use the “ruby” variant of the gem.